Music E-Waste

Modern technology has made listening to music easier than ever before. In 1982, the first CD player was released, followed by the first version of the iPod in 2001. In recent times, it has become a common practice to use smartphones to listen to the radio or a music service, something that 87% of 18 to 29 year olds in the United States were reported as having done in 2016 (Anderson, 2016). Continue reading Music E-Waste

Orchestras During Covid-19

Orchestral music may have gotten its start around the renaissance in the 17th century, but it hasn’t lost its relevancy as a music genre. Current research from the Canadian Council of the arts, and Orchestra Canada shows an increase in revenue and attendance for orchestra performances between 2018 and 2019. However, that’s increase has ended with the rest of the music industry since the start of Covid-19. Continue reading Orchestras During Covid-19

Losing The Journalistic Voice in A Crowd of Voices; The Ideas of Political Coverage in Today’s Press of Walter Pincus and Other Writers

“At a time when it is most needed, the media, and particularly newspapers, have lost their voice” (Pincus, 2009). Journalists boast their objectivity, fairness and coverage. However, as suggested by Walter Pincus, today’s journalism has become about neutrality instead of equality and can be mended by more substantial political coverage (Pincus, 2009). Continue reading Losing The Journalistic Voice in A Crowd of Voices; The Ideas of Political Coverage in Today’s Press of Walter Pincus and Other Writers

Harrop, Helen. 2010. Have Fun, Make Art. [Photograph]

Kazoo; More than a Novelty

A Kazoo is a musical instrument resembling a flute, recorder or other wind instruments but quite shorter. The kazoo is a percussion instrument that’s structured differently than typical wind instruments. It’s designed to create a buzzing or timbral quality to the musician’s voice and a resonating membrane. To use a kazoo ones blows, or speaks through the membrane to produce the buzzing quality. For more diversity, the musician can completely or partially cover the membrane. Continue reading Kazoo; More than a Novelty

Why I write the way I write; An opinion piece on literary Journalism from Dylanna Fisher

Feature writers first separated themselves from hard-hitting news by writing “human interest stories,” as Wolfe describes them, which were “long and often hideously sentimental accounts of hitherto unknown souls beset by tragedy or unusual hobbies within the sheet’s circulation area… In any case, feature stories gave a man a certain amount of room in which to write.” Continue reading Why I write the way I write; An opinion piece on literary Journalism from Dylanna Fisher